/‘Frequency’ fall concert to premiere after break
(CONTRIBUTED/ Diane Orlofsky) “Frequency” will hold its fall concert after the Thanksgiving break on Tuesday, Nov. 28, at 7 p.m. in the Long Hall choir room.

‘Frequency’ fall concert to premiere after break

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Lacey Alexander

Staff Writer

The student vocal ensemble “frequency” will present its first concert of the year on Tuesday, Nov. 28, after the holiday break, in the Long Hall Choir Room.

Diane Orlofksy, a professor of music, will direct “frequency,” the vocal jazz ensemble on campus, in a free concert at 7 p.m.

The vocal group comprises 14 Troy students, four of them new to the group. In addition to the vocalists, the ensemble will also feature piano, bass and percussion.

Orlofsky said that this year’s ensemble has worked hard to produce a unique sound.

“The members of ‘frequency’ work very hard taking the colors of their voices and mixing them to create what is a beautiful work of art,” Orlofsky said. “We have a very cohesive, unified sound that only comes from very hard work.”

“Frequency” will perform vocal jazz covers of hit songs, some with accompaniment and some without. Artists who will be covered in this show include Elton John, Stevie Wonder and Ben Rector.

Orlofsky also said that the concert itself would have a unique sound and will feature “a medley of World War II-era charts.”

“We have gone back to some of our a cappella roots in this performance,” Orlofsky said. “I also enjoy the pieces with just piano, very stripped down and minimal, where the piano is the 15th voice.”

Paxton Moeller, a junior music education major from Opelika and “frequency” member, said he was excited to perform with the group.

“We all have a passion for creating music together,” Moeller said. “‘Frequency’ is more than just another choir group at Troy.”

Matthew Tyree, a junior music education major from Oxford, Alabama, and a member of the ensemble, also said the relationship among the group is what made it special and every performance “memorable.”

“If one of us is down, everyone chips in to pick that person back up,” Tyree said. “It’s not every day that you get to perform with a group that’s so close.”

“The music they perform is difficult, but since they have an ‘all for one and one for all’ attitude, there is 100 percent buy-in by all members, and it works,” Orlofsky said. “We aren’t joking when we call them the ‘frequency’ family.”