/GOODBYE COLUMN: Take time to explore possibilities in order to find your passions in your career
(GRAPHIC/Lizz Robb) Michael Shipma reflects on his experience working at the Tropolitan and shares advice to readers.

GOODBYE COLUMN: Take time to explore possibilities in order to find your passions in your career

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Michael Shipma

Sports Editor

Boy, oh boy, it’s been a wild ride.

I’m sure I’m not the only senior ready to graduate and start the next phase of my life, and I’m sure my fellow graduating Troppers will be saying the same in their respective pieces. With that in mind, I won’t make this piece too long or too sappy, because it’s just not my style.

Instead, I want to reflect on the incredible opportunities I’ve been given, and the amazing experience I’ve gained while working for the Trop.

For those who don’t know me personally, I started out on the Trop staff in the fall of 2014 as a wee staff writer. Like many, I had no idea what I wanted to do during and after college, but I was already a declared sport management major before stepping on campus.

It all changed when I started writing for the paper.

Journalism quickly became my passion, and through my time as a writer and eventually as the sports section editor, I’ve learned so many things I think — no, I know — have set me ahead of the curve as I move on from college.

I say this so hopefully you, the reader, will try and find your own passions while at college, hone your skills and gain valuable hands-on experience. Don’t sweat the small, petty social issues that seem to plague your college years, because all  will come with time.

Instead, focus on you and your future. Find out how to prepare for what’s ahead, and then go do it! It’s honestly  simple.

Trust me, it’ll be worth it to know while others were enjoying some of the more festive aspects of college, you were silently working, so you could craft a better future for yourself and for everyone you care about. Better yet, find satisfaction in the fact you earned your rewards and worked to get to where you wanted to be.

Not to say I did  perfectly by any means, but I hope a little piece of advice helps set you up for success in whatever it is you want to do.

With that, I want to give a sincere “thank you” to everyone at the Trop and to Assistant Professor Steve Stewart, who coached me in more ways than I can count.

Like most things, though, my time with y’all has come to an end, and I’m ready for my next chapter.

Peace!