/Dr. Grantham’s Promotion

Dr. Grantham’s Promotion

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by: Sage Gregson

Dr. Bill Grantham, a long-time professor of anthropology at Troy University, will be taking charge as associate dean for the College of Arts and Sciences.

In his new position, Dr. Grantham will be dealing with all course forms, course changes and substitution forms in the College of Arts and Sciences.  He will also be in charge over the three assistant deans from Dothan, Montgomery and the global campuses for social sciences.

Dr. Jim Rinehart, the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, holds Dr. Grantham in high regard and thinks he is more than ready to take the wheel as associate dean.

“His academic credentials are outstanding,” Dr. Rinehart said.  “There are three things that one reviews when evaluating someone for a position like this.  One is their teaching skills.  Two is their scholarly activity, and three is their service to the university.  Dr. Grantham has been well above average in all three of those.”

Dr. Grantham was born and raised in the suburbs of Birmingham, Ala.

He graduated from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and obtained his doctorate in anthropology at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill.

He began his teaching journey at Troy University in 1994 as professor of anthropology and has served ever since.

During this time, he has written an abundant number of articles and papers on zooarchaeology and ethnography in the Middle East and creation myths of Native Americans.

Dr. Grantham has also authored a textbook on anthropology and a book titled “Creation Myths and Legends of Creek Indians.”

In 2004, he took a position as department chair for social sciences and served for eight years.

Now, as associate dean of Arts and Sciences, Dr. Grantham will be taking an administrative position.

When asked whether he was frightened of this global responsibility, Dr. Grantham said, “No.  I got to know and work with the people in these areas before, especially the global department, as a department chair.”

As a result of his promotion, Dr. Grantham will be lightening his teaching load and teaching less classes to focus more on the duties of his new position.

However, he will still be active in his teaching of anthropology.

When asking Dr. Rinehart if he had any advice for Dr. Grantham as he took his position as associate dean, Dr. Rinehart said, “I would tell him to be himself.  He should follow his instincts, experience and good judgment.”