/Trojan English & Art Students Collaborate

Trojan English & Art Students Collaborate

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This year Troy University English majors and art majors are coming together to create an effective student collaboration.

Troy University’s student-run literary journal, “The Rubicon,” ended taking submissions on Friday, and the nearly 80 submitted pieces of work were sifted through and handpicked by its editors.

After the selection process, the designing of the journal begins, which serves as the beginning of an exciting artistic collaboration between “The Rubicon” and Troy University’s art department.

This collaboration between departments began last semester but on a smaller scale.

“Last semester we worked with a digital design class,” Candace Turlington, a senior fine arts major and a senior editor of “The Rubicon” from Tallahassee, Fla., said

“It was a fresh approach having professionals design the layout.”

This small beginning has now become an engrossing project between the two departments, and two art classes and their professors are aiding in illustrating and designing the journal.

Caleb Humphreys, a senior English major from Luverne and a senior editor of “The Rubicon,” said, “This semester the screen printing class is illustrating the submissions and, I believe, a design class will be creating the layout for the printed Rubicon.”

“I sent the chosen submissions to professor Skaggs and professor Dismukes, and over the next two months they will create illustrations and design the layout.”

This collaborative process gives students an opportunity to work within their fields of interests and work in their element. This ensures that “The Rubicon” is approached by minds that gravitate towards either discipline, closing the gap between the two different subject matters and making it a more compelling project.

Last semester the literary journal had a successful launch party, which was held at Studio 116.  Fifty individuals attended the party.

The launch party served to create a sense of community between the individuals who submitted content to the journal, and it also shed light on the process of creating “The Rubicon.”

As of now there are no plans or dates for another launch party, but Turlington is in the process of coordinating one.

“As far as the launch party, we don’t have any plans in the works as of yet, but I do feel that it was a huge success last semester and that it was good publicity for both departments,” Turlington said.

“I am going to meet with Sara Dismukes soon to discuss the possibility of having the party at Studio 116 in Brundidge.”

The spring edition of “The Rubicon” is expected to be not only to be a meeting place for student literary talent, but also it is expected to be a demonstration of student visual art and design talent.