/Tours show town history

Tours show town history

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Josh Richards
Staff Writer

Throughout April, Troy will offer walking tours to celebrate its history, as part of the April Walking Tours event created by the Alabama Tourism Department.

This will be the second year that Troy has hosted the tours.

Tours will focus on historical sites, as well as stories of influential people from the town’s history.

“It’s always good to know the history of your town,” said Kathleen Sauer, president of Pike County Chamber of Commerce. “We are one of the oldest cities in the state.”

A historical survey, the Deer Stand Hill Data Survey, provides the basis of the walking tours.

Sauer cited a few parts of the town’s history.

“We do have very historical roots because of the 3 Notch Trail, which was originally a route to Pensacola, and the railroad. City Hall used to be a part of the Carnegie Library that was attached to Troy Normal School.”

Another historic site found in the downtown area is Troy’s Rock Building.

According to the data survey, the Rock Building “was built using native ironstone gathered from all over Pike County by local residents. This building is considered representative of the community spirit of Pike County during the Depression era.”

The Rock Building is currently the topic of discussion for renovation and rehabilitation.

Tours will start at 10 a.m. at the chamber’s office on the square and will last around one hour.

The walking tours begin during the first weekend in April, and will occur every Saturday throughout the month.

The first and third Saturdays will focus on the history of the downtown area. The second Saturday will spotlight the historic College Avenue and the homes on the street.

On the last Saturday, which will be held during Troy’s annual TroyFest, tours will be led by the Pike County Historical Society and may highlight both areas.

Sauer said that Troy has a lot of history that everyone can enjoy.

“We would like to share it,” Sauer said. “We would like to see students interested in it.”