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Hearings evidence Kavanaugh wrong choice for top court

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Pradyot Sharma

Opinion Editor

While the Senate hearings on the sexual misconduct allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh did not bring conclusive evidence to warrant closure, Kavanaugh’s statements and body language showed us he is not temperamentally fit for the top court. 

Throughout the hearing, Kavanaugh seemed more like a candidate fighting for political office rather than someone vying for a lifetime position that demands neutrality. 

Last Thursday, in a move taken from a political playbook, Kavanaugh said in his opening statement that the sexual harassment scandal was “revenge on behalf of the Clintons.”

Highlights of the hearing include Kavanaugh responding to Sen. Amy Klobuchar’s question about being blackout drunk by asking her if she had blacked out.

Kavanaugh also said that events in his calendar including “devil’s triangle,” which is commonly associated with sex, were references to a drinking game and his liking of beer over 30 times. 

Kavanaugh was clearly playing a political game throughout the hearings. His game plan hinged on expressing anger about the allegations made against him. Kavanaugh expressed more anger while reading his scripted responses than in responding to questions. This made it evident that most of it was part of an attempt to garner support. 

It is understandable that the allegations against Kavanaugh would be emotionally pressuring, but going on a partisan rant is not the best way for him to prove his worth for the court. 

A potential Supreme Court justice’s best defense should not be “the other side is out to get me.”

Kavanaugh acted like he was entitled to be in the Supreme Court, but the truth is that this is not a guaranteed job. 

The conclusion of the sexual harassment investigation may or may not be in Kavanaugh’s favor, but it is evident that he is willing to hide the truth to get what he wants.

If Supreme Court justices start behaving this way, it would be a major threat to the judiciary process.