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University police presenting ‘Run, hide, fight’ seminars

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Emma Daniel

Staff Writer

The Student Services Office and Troy University Police are offering a series of “Run, Hide, Fight” seminars, offering training on how to handle active shooter situations.

The U.S. had 11 active shooters in the month of January 2018 alone, according to Troy University Police Chief John McCall, who led the event.

McCall offered information on how to potentially spot a future active shooter, using the phrase, “If you see something, say something.” If students notice suspicious behavior, they should let someone know, he elaborated.

In an active shooter situation, McCall stressed staying calm. According to him, panic will take over immediately but responding quickly can save lives.

According to McCall, running is the best possible option, but students should make sure they are accounted for by authorities after reaching a safe area. If students know where the situation is taking place, police say to think ahead and plan escape routes that would avoid the situation entirely.

Running is not always an option, so hiding is the next best action. Police advise to barricade the door using whatever large objects are available. Cover windows, darken the room and even pull fire alarms to alert others in the building.

When running and hiding are not possible, McCall suggests finding any makeshift weapon possible and trying to distract and disarm the shooter by immobilizing all four limbs and the head, working together with as many people as possible to overwhelm the shooter.

“They (students) need to understand what happens in active shooter situations and develop a plan for themselves and how to protect themselves,” McCall said when asked why students should attend the seminar. “They can learn things to possibly save their life.”

He also stressed the importance of faculty in these situations.

“Faculty are considered to be leaders, and we need someone to step forward and help guide and direct others,” McCall said.

Upcoming hour-long seminars will be held at 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 1, in room 224 of the Trojan Center, and 9:30 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 2, in the civic room upstairs in the dining hall. Space is limited to 50 people per session.