New member activities to resume for all fraternities except DKE and Sigma Chi

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Emma Daniel

News Editor

After a week of investigations and meetings with every fraternity on campus, new member activities have resumed for all organizations except Sigma Chi and Delta Kappa Epsilon (DKE), according to Dean of Student Service Herbert Reeves.

New member activities for all fraternities were suspended last week following a second investigation over hazing in less than a month. 

The mandatory meetings reviewed new-member policies and reiterated anti-hazing policy and safety.

New-member activities include “social functions and processes related to the intake of new members,” according to a  university statement issued last week.

The meetings were scheduled for Oct. 2 and Oct. 3.

The investigation on DKE is expected to conclude soon.

Sigma Chi has been suspended for the fall 2019 semester over hazing. 

 “I think we definitely got our message across about what our expectations are in regards to hazing and risk management,” Reeves said. “In general they were very positive meetings with the organizations.”

The meetings required each organization to examine their new member practices and evaluate what could be considered hazing. 

“We asked each of them to review their current processes and if they have anything that remotely could be construed as hazing, to let us know or have an alternative plan for that activity,” Reeves said. “We asked each chapter for a recommitment in writing that they would do all within their power as campus leaders to help us put an end to this type of behavior.

“What they may consider to be something minor or fun can easily turn into a situation where someone gets hurt, or severely injured or even die.”

John Schmidt, Senior Vice Chancellor of Student Services, also sat in on some of the meetings to encourage positive leadership within the fraternities. 

“I thought the meetings went very well,” Schmidt said. “The men were open and receptive to the messages delivered—hazing has no place on campus.

“We will await to see how it was received and put into practice.”

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