SGA proposes new housing regulation

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(Photo/Zenith Shrestha)

Collin Willis

Staff Writer

Troy’s Student Government Association (SGA) put into motion new regulations and expectations for dorm rooms in the form of two adopted bills on Tuesday.

Bills 2020-01 and 2020-02 titled “Housing Sanitation and Safety Resolution” were proposed by Freshman Forum Delegate Mason Bennett, a sophomore economics major from Panama City Beach, Florida.

The bills (originally meant to be one but split for clarity) will ensure that all residences on campus must pass basic security checkpoints before students can be assigned to them, and certain conditions of a building must be upheld for residents to live safely there.

Bennett showed the results of a few polls he asked on Troy Students Facebook page to confirm how students were feeling about housing and voiced students’ frustrations with housing issues.

“(Students) want housing reform and want it now,” he said during the meeting. “The Physical Plant needs to be held accountable.”

The bill regarding safety in the dorms was passed. It says all doors in residence halls must have functioning locks, and no resident can live inside a room without a functioning lock.

Resolutions about sanitation were denied due to clarification problems on parts of the bill dealing with temperatures and with mold. The committee encouraged revisions to be made to the bill that would lead it to be passed.

Senators raised questions about Troy administration’s involvement in the drafting for this bill — only resident assistants in dorms had been reached out to in forming it.

The denied resolution is expected to be passed sometime next week after peer-suggested revisions, according to Morgan Long, a senior sports management major from Birmingham, Alabama.

“I think both those bills were written with great intentions to help students with the safety and cleanliness of the dorms, and there was great research that has gone into this,” he said.

“I think there were just some steps that were skipped just because there wasn’t a conditioned senator who was writing it…and that’s just a learning curve.”

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